you are not the same person as you were a year ago…keep going and only focus on yourself.

you are not the same person as you were a year ago…keep going and only focus on yourself.

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  1. if you feel this is the case, it may be true!

    But we are not always the best place to really know ourself ! too often we judge ourselves as badly as we judge others! that is to say too much on the surface!

    it is very important to know each other well! It allows us not to be manipulated or to be sad or get angry when we are accused, because if the person is telling the truth, we know it and we just tell him that we are already working there and that all you have to do is wait because everyone is walking! nobody is perfect!

    but if you don't know yourself in truth, flaws like qualities, strengths or weaknesses, then you are and you risk being at the mercy of wicked people, the devil and manipulative humans!

    because they observe you and know you!

    they test you, they tempt you, and they do absolutely whatever they want with you without you realizing it, because they know how to make you feel like you're doing exactly what you want! they don't hesitate to destroy you in or after having used you!

    the correct sentence is: "focus on God and make sure that who you are, what you want and what you do are in harmony and harmony!" like the train on the rails! without deviation! do nothing that is not in perfect harmony with your body, soul and mind! if you force, you get damaged! for example watching horror movies when you don't like violence in your life and in the life of those you love !! cheer up while you love peace! imitate the example of Jesus! he wants pax and love, how did he show it? DO THE SAME!

    do not let anyone say who you are, good or bad !!!

  2. 0:05 if you are in a dark place and you are told things will get better, that will not make you feel better that will make you resent the world more. Because assuming someone has a way is assuming you already know the answer to their problem when they have tried everything. Stop spreading mediocre motivation if its coming from someone who has NEVER had a hard day in their life. They know how to climb out of ponds and they are trying to teach people to climb mountains to get over their problems. STOP BEING MEDIOCRE Videos like this only causes depression.

  3. “I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be uncommon — if I can. I seek opportunity — not security. I do not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me. I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed. I refuse to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of utopia. I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a handout. I will never cower before any master nor bend to any threat. It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations, and to face the world boldly and say, this I have done.”

  4. Only you can make your dreams come true. Life will throw obstacles in your way, but it is how you deal with it that matters. You can't appreciate the mountains, if it weren't for the valley's!👍💯🙏🌼🌻🎶🦋🐎💙

  5. I know that I can heal and grow in every way possible, I know that I can be the person I desire to be. No matter what happened in the past, you can transcend it and grow trough it, it is going to cost something, that is instant pleasure. Dopamine surge.

  6. I feel like my whole life has been preparing me for the pandemic. I put myself through college without student loans, so I knew what I could live without. I've helped take care of my immunocompromised aunt for years, so I knew about sanitation protocol. I have no problem being alone; I spend most of my free time alone regardless, so it's not like there was anyone out there waiting for me. I'm also the type that thrives in emergencies; others can count on me to keep a cool head under pressure. I knew that part already from past experience (a house fire, emergency surgery, etc.), but it was a good reminder. I've also done a lot of traveling, so I keep up on world news. I was in China in late October 2019, less than a month before the outbreak. I even had a supply of unused N95 masks that I'd gotten for the trip, because I thought I'd have to deal with pollution in Beijing. So I was paying attention to the videos that started leaking out of there in December and January. I realized that it was going to be a disaster; China is way, way more organized when it comes to implementing policies. If they couldn't handle COVID, the Untied States was screwed. I knew the writing was on the wall when the Diamond Princess was allowed to dock here in California; the first community spread in the States happened just over an hour away from me. I flat-out told my family that thousands of people were going to die, but they all just laughed at me, saying I was being paranoid.

    No one's laughing now.

    It wasn't so bad at first. Yes, losing my job sucked. I'd just started there only six months prior, and I had negotiated a better schedule only a couple of weeks before. Then the entire town shut down. There was no point in griping. I also read up on how long it'd take to get a vaccine made, and realized that 2020 was basically lost. I settled in for the long haul. The only thing that truly bugged me was how I had to cancel all my travel plans; traveling and hiking are two of my favorite pastimes, and give me the motivation to keep living when all else fails. I had no one waiting for me, but it'd still be nice to go on a trail, or take advantage of the free time and fly somewhere. But it just wouldn't happen. I had to cancel trips to Australia (to which I was just weeks away from going), Hawaii twice, as well as a road trip to Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon National Parks. It drove me nuts at first, but hey, what could do? I just had to ride the pandemic out.

    I was doing okay until my aunt nearly died. She lived with my grandma, and I stopped by every day to help them out. She was in and out of the hospital often enough due to a litany of health problems. She'd cheated death far too many times. She'd just gotten back out in March, when her health declined rapidly over 4 days. First she couldn't walk. Then she couldn't stand up. Then her memory started going. Then she couldn't talk coherently or follow instructions. Then she stopped eating. Then she stopped drinking. By the end, she was grasping feebly, silently for us. It was extremely hard to watch. We finally gave up when she couldn't move in the bed anymore. I called it in, and she was taken to the ER around the same time that cases really spiked here in the Bay Area. My grandma isn't the crying type, but she was sobbing and panicking because she thought my aunt was going to die. The doctor later told me that had I not made the call, she would've been dead within 30 minutes. Turns out she had pneumonia, too much sodium in the brain, nearly failing heart and kidneys, and a blood clot. She ended up surviving, and has been doing extremely well (for her, anyway) for the last year.

    However, that experience changed me. I realized that my efforts to keep my family safe and healthy may not be enough, and there was a possibility that they could all die. It also made realize that I couldn't just ride this one out. I had been at my life's crossroads for too long, stuck in a job that had turned out to be a dead end. And with it gone, I didn't have any prospects. I needed to prepare for what comes after the chaos dies down. I vowed to myself that I wouldn't just survive the pandemic, I'd thrive. I'd come out of this further ahead than others, and find a way to take advantage of it. I'd taken a few career assessment tests, and they all pointed to Earth Sciences. I'd been on the fence about going back to college for a few years, but now seemed like the perfect opportunity thanks to all the free time, stimulus checks, and invention of Zoom. I graduated from college several years ago, but now I'd be returning to it almost exactly 20 years since I started the first time. I looked up what Earth Science programs I could do, and made a shocking discovery: Thanks to the sheer variety of courses I took a couple of decades ago, I'd nearly completed degrees for Environmental Science and Geography completely by accident. I just needed a semester for each. I didn't know how I'd fare due to my age and inexperience with online learning, but it was a calculated risk that worked out extremely well. I got perfect grades and obtained both degrees a month ago. What I've learned in those courses will be essential knowledge in a rapidly growing field within the next few decades. I even finally got to go on that road trip to Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon for Memorial Day. Not a bad way to celebrate getting a couple of degrees and surviving a killer pandemic.

    TLDR: I feel like my whole life has prepared me for the pandemic; there were a lot of coincidences that happened to shape my experiences in just the right way. I was content to ride it out, even though not being able to travel really bothered me. I was fine until I watched my aunt nearly die. Afterwards, I promised myself that I'd not only survive the pandemic, but I'd thrive. So I went back to college remotely and earned degrees in Environmental Science and Geography. I'm coming out of this pandemic stronger and better educated than I was before.

  7. Refine your personality, be free to live the life that you want to live by making choices and apply what you want to do. You must determine where you are going in your life, because you cannot get there unless you move in that direction. To stand up straight with your with eyes wide open and accept the responsibility of life. It means deciding to voluntarily transform the chaos of it all into your own habitable order.